Why You Should Consider Living In A Tent

Recently I found myself wondering and talking about some of the quirky and brilliant ways people from around the world use tents. Consequently I pondered about the possibility that some people have contemplated or even opted for living in a tent permanently. Inspired by this idea, I dug a bit further into this topic of permanent tented accommodation.

What would living in a tent full time entail? Some individuals might be unnerved by this idea, while others might be thrilled and excited to take on the challenge and some may have no alternative. Whatever the reason or justification – there are 5 indisputable and great benefits of moving from your modern home to kicking it in a tent.

1. The cost effectiveness is clear

Finding the right location to pitch your tent will definitely decrease your monthly cost of rent, electricity and the like. The idea of saving on your expenses in this matter might seem slightly extreme, but compare it to running a modern household and you may just change your mind. Naturally, you might be concerned about cold winters, no internet and not having warm showers, but there are ways to avoid that. You could invest in a proper tent and enough winter provisions, sign-up at a gym that has shower amenities and use the free internet offered by libraries, coffee-shops and even shopping malls.

2. It will be an invigorating challenge and a noteworthy experience

Having a luxury, purpose-designed, tent will definitely make the experience more comfortable and less effortful, but it will still be a demanding challenge to live in a tent full time. There is, however, a multitude of people who find pleasure, excitement and gratification from such difficult tasks and many people thrive in it! Facing and conquering a challenge like this will without a doubt be tremendously rewarding and enriching. It will not only emancipate you and boost your self-respect and dignity, but it will also offer you a sense of accomplishment being able to live and take care of yourself like our ancestors, before modernism.

3. It will significantly reduce your Eco Footprint

We are all becoming increasingly aware of the importance of reducing and the impact of our Eco Footprint. This starts with being more conscious of leaving less of a negative ecological footprint on Earth and ensuring it is as small as possible. Comparing the running a modern household to living in a tent – it is clear that a tent leaves an immensely small Eco Footprint. If you are already concerned about Earth’s future and reducing the impact you have on Mother Nature – you are most likely thoroughly ready and able to live in a tent permanently.

4. It will allow you to experience forest bathing

Although the thought of submerging yourself in the open waters hidden within forests is enchanting – forest bathing actually refers to spending time amongst trees and is an established way of increasing you happiness and health. Japanese studies have uncovered that the phytoncides released by plants aid in regulating your body, improve the immune system and increases air intake – which leads to happiness and increased health.

5. It offers you a less complicated way of life

Modern life is often characterised by a constant rush and a milieu of complication. Life in a tent forces you to pay attention to the things that are truly important. Tent-living is a way of life that is simpler and more focused on what really matters, as well as a shift in true perspective. Due to few people having experienced a genuine simple life – living in a tent will very much be life changing and meaningful moment.

While researching this article I happened upon an astonishing variety of, what is coined as, glamping tents. Some companies put a double bed and a carpet inside and call it glamping and then others deliver tent structures with flooring, proper windows and doors, bathroom amenities and beautifully decorated interiors.

8 Things to Consider When Choosing a Strata Manager

Our insider tips to the questions you should be asking your prospective Strata Manager.

Good or bad, most people judge an entire strata agency on the working relationship they have with their strata manager.

We have prepared this short list of questions that you should be asking prior to making a decision to appoint a new Strata Agent.

How many buildings does your proposed new Strata Manager already look after

Your entire strata experience depends on this simple question. Most agents manage large portfolios, to the point where they can spend most of their time putting out spot fires rather than giving you the proactive service that you are looking for.

What’s included in the monthly management fee

Most agencies charge a monthly management fee which covers agreed services. Works performed outside of the agreed services are charged as an additional fee. You can negotiate with an agency to have fixed price disbursements to give you a clearer understanding of how much your scheme will be paying per year.

Qualifications

The Strata Manager that will be managing your building should at least hold a Certificate 4 in Strata Title Management. Ideally this would have been gained through a Tafe course. It is possible to get a Certificate 4 in Strata Management by paying to do a 2 week course. It is also a good idea to ask how long they have been with the agency.

Experience

When approaching a potential new agent, it’s a fair question to ask how much experience the strata manager has that will actually be managing your building and in case things do go wrong, how much experience they have in attending mediation and tribunal hearings.

Reporting

How often are financial reports generated and are they delivered just the treasurer to the entire committee? Ideally this will be available on a monthly basis.

Service Level Agreements

Strata management is customer service. Your new agent should be able to provide you with time frames of when your requests will be actioned, emails replied to and telephone calls returned.

Your money, your input

It’s your building and you don’t necessarily want the Strata Manager to do everything, so it’s important to clarify how much input will you have in approving creditor payments and what level of input will the committee have when the agent is preparing the proposed budget.

Agreement terms

When appointing a new agent, most will try to lock you in for the maximum period of 3 years. If the services doesn’t meet your expectations you are locked in for the term of the agreement, unless your scheme decides to pay out the remaining term of the agreement. It is a better option to sign a one year agreement and see how things go.

5 Things You Must Do With a Log Cabin In Winter

Log cabins are probably the most popular trend in real estate today. People are in love with these gorgeous dwellings, especially as the McMansions that are so common continue to spread across the country. Who wants to live in something so cheaply made, especially when it looks exactly the same as every other boring house on the block?

But one of the drawbacks about log cabins is that they do require more maintenance. It is worth it, especially when considering value and permanence. After all, a log cabin can last for generations, where a cheaply made house can fall apart before the mortgage is even paid.

Here are five things you must do with a log cabin in winter to keep it in tip top condition.

Inspect The Outside

The outside of your cabin is where problems are most likely to occur. Weather can seriously wear down the condition of the outside and in areas where the climate is more extreme it is worst. Damp is especially bad for wood, which can rot or warp, though sunshine can cause cracks and dryness in the logs.

Every new season it is important than you do an inspection to make sure there are no impending issues that could cause problems. For instance, you might notice a thumb sized area of one of your walls it soft and presses inward. This is a sign of rot and once it has started it can quickly grow out of control. Or maybe you see a plank that has bulged out. This is wood warping, usually caused by moisture behind the wood that has caused it to expand outward.

Catching these things before the snow falls makes it easier to replace or repair anything that needs to be, It also gives you a chance to restain, something you should do to the wood every three to five years.

Inspect The Inside

Once the outside is secure it is time to go inside to see what might be done there. A log cabin is pretty solid and cozy, so hopefully you won’t run into any issues. But there are some that are possible to come across so you should always be vigilant in your inspections.

The first problem to look out for is signs of pests. As the weather turns colder, different creatures are going to seek shelter from the chill. Mice, insects, spiders and even small mammals like raccoons could be trying to find a way into your home as you read this. Once they get in they can wreak havoc, especially those that have burrowed into the wood like termites. They can cause damage to your house, due to scratching, biting, burrowing and waste.

Look for any signs of these critters. Go to the smaller areas of the house, like dark corners, unused rooms, closets, basements, attics or crawlspaces. Put a couple of barrier methods around your house to prevent anything from crossing over.

If you do find signs of an infestation, either bug bomb/spray yourself, or contact an exterminator who can lay out traps or fumigate for you. The sooner in the season you get it done, the better.

Pre-Spring Clean

We have all heard of Spring Cleaning, but Pre-Spring Cleaning may be even more crucial. If your house isn’t ready for the winter it isn’t ready for you to settle in and be comfortable during the frigid months ahead.

This includes removing all dust, mold and dirt from inside your home, freshening rooms that aren’t as commonly used, cleaning carpets or polishing hardwood floors, storing items for warmer months and cleaning/preparing ones for the colder and opening the chute to your fireplace and making sure it is clean and ready to go.

This might seem like a lot of work, but it is going to ensure your winter is a wonderland and not a nightmare.

Clean and Cover Gutters

Your gutters are going to be a major source of problems if you don’t get them regularly cleaned. When they back up with debris it allows rain and snow to gather and overflow, or to stay stagnant and rot the wood of your log cabin until it is cleared out. You want to make sure that never happens and so clean them out every few months.

For winter you won’t want to go out on a ladder and risk falling in the ice. So you should clear them at the beginning of the season and making sure there are no leaves still on trees nearby where they could drop in.

To keep any further debris you can get gutter covers. These little marvels allow you to snap them over the top, some magnetically and some using little clasps. This keeps things out and protects them through the winter.

You can also add an extender to the drain pipe. It will send water further from your home and keep water from building as the base of your log cabin, where it can damage the wood and foundation.

Weather strip Your Log Cabin

Want to keep cozy as the weather gets colder and colder? Stopping leaks and drafts is a good way to do it. Weather stripping will trap hot air in your home and keep it from letting out through cracks under the doors, around windows and even through your chimney, attic or basement.

You can hire someone to do it for you and it can be worth the extra cost to really seal things in. But weather stripping is also a DIY project that is pretty basic for most homeowners. You can find materials and kits online or at your local hardware store. The average cost is around $200 – $300 for an entire house. This can be more or less expensive, depending on if you do it yourself or hire someone to weatherize your log cabin for you.